The How-Tos of Hybridization

In the past four weeks, our time in lecture has been spent bridging the gap between principles (general chemistry) and preparing for the first exam. One topic that has a recurring theme between the two is hybridization. I have noticed two major groups of students: (1) those who need review, and (2) those who are … Continue reading The How-Tos of Hybridization

How Do You Keep Content Fresh for Students While Also Maintaining the Integrity of Your Course?

For the professors reading this post, I am writing to gain some insight by asking for your advice. Even though I have been teaching organic chemistry for five years now, I still struggle with how to assess my students’ knowledge.  When I was a student, we had a series of free-response/short-answer questions on our exams. I … Continue reading How Do You Keep Content Fresh for Students While Also Maintaining the Integrity of Your Course?

Building Students’ Organic Chemistry Toolbox to Set Them Up for Exam Success

We have now approached Exam 3, which means that students have been exposed to material that includes Chapter 19 content. I am quite excited to see that my students are starting to build their “organic chemistry toolbox,” but I've also noticed that they are starting to confuse how and when reagents are used. While I … Continue reading Building Students’ Organic Chemistry Toolbox to Set Them Up for Exam Success

The Transition from Online Classes Back to In-Person Classes

As college instructors, we are fortunate to begin each semester with a fresh start, and Spring 2021 will be no different. In fact, this current semester already poses its own unique set of questions for me and my students as we plan to return to campus. How can we interact together safely? And how can … Continue reading The Transition from Online Classes Back to In-Person Classes

How to Conduct a Lab Course amidst a Pandemic?

Teaching labs online this fall has been quite unique. I am one of many instructors who has struggled with how best to instruct my students, particularly because labs require hands-on learning that can be difficult to simulate through a screen. However, my colleagues and I were inspired from our rapid transition to online classes this … Continue reading How to Conduct a Lab Course amidst a Pandemic?

Coaching Students in the Transition from Chapter 9 to Chapter 10

Chapters 6-10 incrementally ramp up the types of things we hold students accountable for when it comes to reactions. Chapters 6 and 7 introduce students to the 10 most common elementary steps. Chapter 8 deals with constructing multistep mechanisms in reasonable ways. In Chapter 9, students learn how to predict the outcome of SN1/SN2/E1/E2 competition. … Continue reading Coaching Students in the Transition from Chapter 9 to Chapter 10

“Keep” vs “Toss”: Skills and Tactics to Consider As an Instructor

It should come as no surprise that teaching online has been a challenge this term. Across the board, both students and professors have experienced growing pains. I know that, amidst the pandemic, we haven't had our first choice of instruction style or teaching materials, but I still hope that this post can bring some clarity … Continue reading “Keep” vs “Toss”: Skills and Tactics to Consider As an Instructor

If I Could Turn Back Time

As a teacher, I try to remember what organic chemistry was like for me as a student. I know that to be effective instructors, we need to be able to see topics through our students’ eyes. After five years in academia, my list of main organic chemistry takeaways has grown to the following five points: … Continue reading If I Could Turn Back Time

Proton Transfer Reactions and Thinking Like a Chemist

Teaching students how to think like a chemist is a challenging, but necessary feature of any organic chemistry course. A seemingly simple question such as, “How will these two compounds react when I mix them?” can stump even the best students. Since it is impossible to memorize every possible reaction combination, students must rely on … Continue reading Proton Transfer Reactions and Thinking Like a Chemist

Welcome to Fall semester! We’re happy to be back so to kick off the new season we are sharing this insightful post from Professor Todd Eckroat of Penn State Erie- The Behrend College.

When I was first approached about contributing to this blog, I was hesitant. I’m only 32 years old and have only been a full-time faculty member for 3 years. Surely, I don’t have as much to offer as colleagues that have been doing this for many years and been through many textbooks by varying authors, … Continue reading Welcome to Fall semester! We’re happy to be back so to kick off the new season we are sharing this insightful post from Professor Todd Eckroat of Penn State Erie- The Behrend College.