How an Objective Becomes a Smartwork Question

Norton’s Smartwork is the online homework system that supports students using Karty’s Organic Chemistry. Within this system there are thousands of questions which can be used for homework assignments, quizzes or even exams. But this robust library of questions doesn’t just spring from nowhere. Behind every question, there are multiple people and hours of work. … Continue reading How an Objective Becomes a Smartwork Question

Consistency is Key

When I talk to other faculty who are using the Karty book I find that we share a love of Chapter 7. In this chapter, the most common elementary steps are presented, those being proton transfer, biomolecular nucleophilic substitution, coordination, heterolysis, nucleophilic addition, nucleophile elimination, biomolecular elimination, electrophilic addition, electrophile elimination, and carbocation rearrangements.  Every … Continue reading Consistency is Key

“The Right Answer Always Looks Right”

How to Make the Most of Practice Exams Practice exams can be a valuable learning tool if they’re used correctly by students. They have the potential to give students access to exam-level questions that ask them to synthesize ideas across multiple topics, provide an example for the exam length and question styles, and offer students … Continue reading “The Right Answer Always Looks Right”

Looking Forward with the Third Edition

As an educator, part of my summer fun is thinking about ways to revitalize and improve my courses in the coming year. This summer, the arrival of the third edition of Joel Karty’s Organic Chemistry: Principles and Mechanisms is giving me a lot to get excited about. While I have always appreciated the mechanism-based approach to organic … Continue reading Looking Forward with the Third Edition

Are pKa’s Necessary to Succeed in the Classroom?

While teaching chapters 17-18, I have shown students the versatility of carbonyls and enolate chemistry. The discussion in Karty’s book is arranged well and does a nice job of spotlighting the chemistry unique to carbonyls, especially as it ranges from selective addition (direct or conjugate) to the use of enolates for alkylation and halogenation.  In … Continue reading Are pKa’s Necessary to Succeed in the Classroom?

Smartwork online homework and written problem sets: A perfect marriage

Learning organic chemistry is not a linear process; rather, it’s made up of many small cycles. Each cycle begins when we present students the basic ideas behind a new topic. Then we’ll show students how to apply those ideas toward solving a few initial problems, and we’ll follow that up with an assignment where students … Continue reading Smartwork online homework and written problem sets: A perfect marriage

What is most effective: Cause and Effect or Named Reactions?

At this point in the semester, my class has progressed past their first exam, and I have helped students on all points of content mastery. In those interactions, I have heard a number of things to make me wonder…what is the most effective way to learn the content? Do students prefer the cause-and-effect perspective or … Continue reading What is most effective: Cause and Effect or Named Reactions?

A, B, C’s of Williamson Ether Synthesis

Williamson ether synthesis at the basic leave is rooted in the conditions of an SN2 reaction. However, students still struggle with the content. I have found myself trying to remind my class of the basics. I am quite fond of the Karty text, and have tried to compliment the book mechanics with some organically-flavored A … Continue reading A, B, C’s of Williamson Ether Synthesis

Break-Brain: How Do Instructors Reconnect Students to the Content

I am not sure if other instructors have this issue, but how do you connect students back to the content? Sometimes I wonder if the first week of the spring semester is worse than the first week of the fall semester. My class ended the semester on chapter 9 content, while my colleague left the … Continue reading Break-Brain: How Do Instructors Reconnect Students to the Content