First Impressions: The Big Switch, Part 1

My entire academic career as both a student and as an instructor, I have always taught or been taught organic chemistry using the functional group approach: beginning with the tried and true method of labeling chapters by functional groups and then moving on to learn how to name, synthesize, and react with the functional group … Continue reading First Impressions: The Big Switch, Part 1

Flipping the Script: Mechanistic Organization Encourages Cooperative Learning

When I first heard Joel Karty speak about his mechanistic organization in his organic chemistry text around 2016,  I had also heard a lot of buzz about flipping the classroom. I was very curious about trying this in my own classroom, but implementing self-directed learning with a more intricate discipline like organic chemistry can seem … Continue reading Flipping the Script: Mechanistic Organization Encourages Cooperative Learning

Karty’s Method Stands Alone, and With It So Can Your Students

One of the biggest (and sometimes the most difficult) decisions to make when teaching a course is the textbook choice.  Knowing if you made the right decision can be tough to tell.  Well, last semester I got some unsolicited feedback from students that put my mind at ease about deciding to adopt Joel Karty's Principles … Continue reading Karty’s Method Stands Alone, and With It So Can Your Students

In Favor of Putting Pen to Paper

With the advent of increasingly sophisticated, convenient, and useful online homework programs, is there any place left for the classic pencil and paper textbook problems? I will have to preface this by going ahead and stating my general biases. Probably the most effective way to do this would be to tell you all that in … Continue reading In Favor of Putting Pen to Paper

Floppity or Floop?

There are a lot of research articles, opinions, blog posts, and conversations about new teaching methods nowadays, and there are a lot of great ideas floating around, but I’m just going to go right out there and say that the prospect of flipping my organic chemistry class terrified me as much as I thought it … Continue reading Floppity or Floop?

In Learning You Will Teach

This is my 2nd year using the Karty text for Organic Chemistry Lecture (CHEM 3111). Based on my experiences as a student and as an instructor, organic chemistry has been typically taught in a traditional format of a chalk talk and PowerPoint combination. However, after speaking with those instructors, such as Joel Karty and fellow … Continue reading In Learning You Will Teach

Organically Gaining Synthetic Expertise

I started teaching Karty’s textbook in my first full-time teaching position, and I am not looking back. At the end of each semester as I review my course plan and think about what worked that semester and what didn’t, I always notice new ways in which this textbook design is smart, student-centered, and ultimately makes … Continue reading Organically Gaining Synthetic Expertise

Students are Doin’ it for Themselves

As several contributors to this blog have pointed out, Joel Karty’s text introduces biochemistry topics early in the course through supplementary sections at the end of most chapters titled, “The Organic Chemistry of Biomolecules.” Many instructors have lauded this early inclusion of biomolecular topics as a motivator for biology majors and pre-professional students; one that … Continue reading Students are Doin’ it for Themselves