How to Conduct a Lab Course amidst a Pandemic?

Teaching labs online this fall has been quite unique. I am one of many instructors who has struggled with how best to instruct my students, particularly because labs require hands-on learning that can be difficult to simulate through a screen. However, my colleagues and I were inspired from our rapid transition to online classes this … Continue reading How to Conduct a Lab Course amidst a Pandemic?

“Keep” vs “Toss”: Skills and Tactics to Consider As an Instructor

It should come as no surprise that teaching online has been a challenge this term. Across the board, both students and professors have experienced growing pains. I know that, amidst the pandemic, we haven't had our first choice of instruction style or teaching materials, but I still hope that this post can bring some clarity … Continue reading “Keep” vs “Toss”: Skills and Tactics to Consider As an Instructor

The Best Tactics for Learning the Elementary Steps of Organic Chemistry

I am a big advocate of the Karty textbook and how it presents mechanisms to the audience. However, mechanisms are not every student’s favorite topic. While some chapters are quite easy to present, others prove to be more challenging for students. I have found that Chapter 7 (“An Overview of the Most Common Elementary Steps”), … Continue reading The Best Tactics for Learning the Elementary Steps of Organic Chemistry

If I Could Turn Back Time

As a teacher, I try to remember what organic chemistry was like for me as a student. I know that to be effective instructors, we need to be able to see topics through our students’ eyes. After five years in academia, my list of main organic chemistry takeaways has grown to the following five points: … Continue reading If I Could Turn Back Time

Success Means That You Put Your Pen to Paper

Oftentimes in class, professors are asked,  “What can I do to do better in class? Could you offer more practice?” To help answer this question, I was given some great advice by my senior colleague: if you aren’t putting your pen to paper, then you likely aren’t studying organic chemistry sufficiently.  During my current semester … Continue reading Success Means That You Put Your Pen to Paper

Rules of Thumb (ROTs) for Chair Conformations and Substituent Stability

Regardless of the format of organic chemistry classes (e.g. online, hybrid, F2F), many students struggle with chair conformations. Because it is our job, as educators, to help convey challenging material as clearly as possible, I like to provide rules of thumb (ROTs) to my students, which are a major component of my teaching style. Below are … Continue reading Rules of Thumb (ROTs) for Chair Conformations and Substituent Stability

Teaching Online: How to Beat the COVID Blues

Here at Columbus State University (CSU), I am teaching 1 online section of 56 students this fall. I have found that the flipped classroom is immensely helpful for myself and my students. Although online teaching and flipping the classroom can have their own set of challenges, I have found a renewed spirit and vigor for … Continue reading Teaching Online: How to Beat the COVID Blues

Has It Really Been Six Years?: Part II

Context Is Everything! So, coming back to the gray-hair issue that I mentioned in last week’s post, I have been teaching for long enough that sometimes I need to take a step back and remind myself that most of my students don’t know very much chemistry, especially not the chemistry of their day-to-day lives. This … Continue reading Has It Really Been Six Years?: Part II

Has It Really Been Six Years?: Part I

I have a photo of me and my oldest son taped to a shelf in my office. In the picture, I’m holding him up and we’re wearing matching red bandanas. He was about 3-years-old at the time (he's 13 now), and I had a full head of bright red hair. But today, it’s almost all … Continue reading Has It Really Been Six Years?: Part I