In Favor of Putting Pen to Paper

With the advent of increasingly sophisticated, convenient, and useful online homework programs, is there any place left for the classic pencil and paper textbook problems? I will have to preface this by going ahead and stating my general biases. Probably the most effective way to do this would be to tell you all that in … Continue reading In Favor of Putting Pen to Paper

The First Semester: A Slower Pace Wins the Race

In my last post, Results of Four Years of Teaching the Mechanism, I talked about the increasing ACS Organic Exam scores I have observed in my students over the previous four years of using the Karty approach.  As I am preparing for the 5th year and the first time using the second edition this Fall, … Continue reading The First Semester: A Slower Pace Wins the Race

FAQ: How far through the text should I get by the end of the first semester?

Let me begin by answering a different, but related, question: How far does Joel Karty get by the end of the first semester? The answer is that I typically cover 13 chapters, or roughly half the textbook. For several years, I was covering the first 13 chapters in order, ending the first semester with Chapter … Continue reading FAQ: How far through the text should I get by the end of the first semester?

Results of Four Years of Teaching the Mechanism

I adopted the Karty textbook four years ago.  I had been using a book organized by functional group but focused on the subject from a mechanistic approach. When it came to choosing a new textbook, I reviewed most of the textbooks on the market and asked my current and previous students their opinions of each … Continue reading Results of Four Years of Teaching the Mechanism

What do origami and organic chemistry have in common?

The origami molecule on the cover art of this blog is mechlorethamine, a DNA alkylating agent that is used to treat various kinds of cancer. Mechlorethamine was used successfully in clinical settings in the 1940’s and those successes led to the development of anticancer chemotherapy as a field. Folding origami and learning organic chemistry are … Continue reading What do origami and organic chemistry have in common?

My Best Experience Yet Teaching Synthesis

In a previous blog post (A Mechanistic Organization and Learning Synthesis: Having Cake and Eating It, Too), I articulated that switching to a mechanistic organization has improved how my students deal with synthesis problems. Things have continued to work well, but this year I made a change to enhance how I teach synthesis, and student … Continue reading My Best Experience Yet Teaching Synthesis

How far do you get in first semester organic chemistry?

The title of this post is an honest question and I encourage anyone to reply in the comments! I ask this question in part because sometimes I feel like I am the slowest organic chemistry professor in the country. Allow me to elaborate. I teach a small section of organic chemistry and I am the … Continue reading How far do you get in first semester organic chemistry?

Ten Elementary Steps Are Better Than Four

Mechanisms can greatly simplify learning organic chemistry because the hundreds of reactions that students need to know have mechanisms that are constructed from just a handful of distinct elementary steps. This is easy for us professors to see—after all, we’ve been through the year’s reactions and mechanisms multiple times. Students, on the other hand, must … Continue reading Ten Elementary Steps Are Better Than Four

Happy Holidays!

Another semester of teaching the mechanism is over! Last year, Rick Bunt of Middlebury College wrote this festive end-of-the-semester song for his students (sung to the tune of “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”). It’s so good we thought we’d post it again! You’ve had Spanish and Bio And History and Calc, Physics and Econ And Poly Sci … Continue reading Happy Holidays!

What’s in a NOM? Nomenclature that Actually Makes Sense.

One aspect of Karty’s text that surprised me when I began using the book was the separation of nomenclature into individual sections. My previous experience, going all the way back to my days as a student, was to have the introduction to naming tucked into other material, usually served along side the properties of alkanes, … Continue reading What’s in a NOM? Nomenclature that Actually Makes Sense.