You Are Ready for the Final Once You Drink Some Coffee

We made it to the final chapter: Chapter 26 (“Polymers”). Each student is filled with a sense of pride that they have read every chapter in their textbook. Chapter 26 allows us to review mechanisms from throughout the text with real world applications. These applications are good preparation for next week’s final. In discussing them, … Continue reading You Are Ready for the Final Once You Drink Some Coffee

All Downhill After the Aldol

Ah yes, it is that time of year again; a seven week coast to the Organic Chemistry II finish line. All the elementary steps have been introduced and discussed multiple times and it feels like review from here. Most texts seem to end with reactions like Aldol condensation and Robinson Annulation. A functional group approach … Continue reading All Downhill After the Aldol

Building on their Knowledge: From Atoms to Multi-Step Synthesis to Curing Sick Puppies

Karty’s mechanistic approach to organic chemistry provides the content organization to facilitate student success. In a functional group approach students are more likely to apply an incorrect mechanism to solve a synthetic problem. This is because classification by functional group does not provide an organizational level that allows students to classify reactivity. Organization by functional … Continue reading Building on their Knowledge: From Atoms to Multi-Step Synthesis to Curing Sick Puppies

Improvements on Retrosynthetic Analysis

Success in organic chemistry is heavily reliant on a student’s ability to identify patterns. Until recently, I organized my course by functional group. It was only after I adopted Joel Karty’s approach that I recognized that the variety of reactions used to synthesize each functional group can vary widely and that this variance makes it … Continue reading Improvements on Retrosynthetic Analysis

Making Backward Mechanism Arrows An Endangered Species

I’ve just finished grading the first exam for my Organic II course and I’ve experienced something I never have before. Of the more than 50 students that took my Organic I course last semester, none of them drew a single mechanism arrow in the wrong direction [1]. Yes, some of these students did get parts … Continue reading Making Backward Mechanism Arrows An Endangered Species

The Three M’s: Motivating, Modernizing, and MCAT

At most colleges and universities, students enrolled in organic chemistry come from a variety of majors and pre-professional programs. At St. Kate’s, the organic sections are a 20/20/40 split of chemistry, food & nutrition science, and biology majors. Twenty percent of our students are enrolled in organic in order to fulfill prerequisites for a variety … Continue reading The Three M’s: Motivating, Modernizing, and MCAT

Surprising Advances for Students at All Levels

When I first perused the Preliminary Edition of Joel Karty’s textbook, I was apprehensive about the organization and whether students would really benefit from this change. Midway through the first semester it became clear to me that a mechanistically organized course creates a broad-based platform that gets to the heart of what we are trying … Continue reading Surprising Advances for Students at All Levels

About

Teach the Mechanism is a platform for Joel Karty and organic chemistry educators to share their experiences and discuss the benefits of a mechanistically organized course. By inviting professors from a wide variety of schools to be guest bloggers we accomplish an array of topics and unique perspectives. Please get to know Joel Karty and … Continue reading About